Suzuki Burgman 650: The King of the Scooters

Introduction

The Suzuki Burgman 650 has a parallel twin engine that makes 55 horsepower and a CVT transmission. It has all the performance you could want plus a lot of high-end features, such as ABS, electric folding mirrors and an adjustable screen, heated grips and seat, an immobilizer, and two power modes.

It’s big, but that means great comfort for two (there are even grab rails for the passenger) and great weather protection. It also has a huge storage area under the seat that can be expanded with a top box. At 610 pounds, it’s not very light, but since most of that weight is worked down, it’s not a big deal. It gets 59 MPG, which is also great, and the gas tank can hold almost four gallons, so it’s great for touring.

Pros

  • Ergonomics that make riding comfortable.
  • 10 or more gals of space under the seats.

Cons

  • May feel a bit too heavy
  • Comes with a hefty price tag.

Hero Xtreme Sports review on ride

Hero made motorcycles with Honda before they became MotoCorp in 1999. In that year, they launched a bike called the Hero Honda CBZ. It was later renamed the Hero Honda CBZ Xtreme and got some really cool new features. Hero later stopped making motorcycles under the CBZ name and just called them “Xtreme.” The company has now made a version with a more muscular look called the Xtreme Sports that has more power.

Since it leans slightly forward and has sharp lines, the Hero Xtreme Sports looks pretty good. The front of the car has a short-nosed headlight, and on either side of it are blue city lights. The front fender has fake air scoops cut out of it, which make the bike look more sporty. There are nice gold adjustable shock absorbers that go with it.

The fully updated reading panel is mounted on top of the headlamp cluster. On the left side is a big tachometer, and on the right is a computer speedometer. On top of it are the high beam, neutral gear, and fuel gauge.

An extra safety feature on the Hero is a light that turns on when the starting key is turned on and shows if the side stand is in use. What’s interesting is that the starting key is not in the usual place, between the handlebars, but instead it is in the headlamp cluster. It is now put to the right of the headlight, below the handlebar. The clip-on handlebars make the motorbike look even more sporty. On the handlebars is a normal set of switches that work pretty well.

Review and Test Ride

  • Scooters have changed quickly over the years, becoming more than just an easy way to get around cities. Their change has made them something that can now be a part of your style. Yamaha has taken this a step further by making the Fascino scooter, which is aimed at the stylish traveler.
  • People either love or hate the way the Yamaha Fascino looks. There are a lot of shapes and chrome on the body. The horns have been given a retro look, and there are big turn signals on the front apron. Adding metal to the front makes it look nice, but it’s not very interesting. The instrument panel is big, simple, and easy to read, and the mudguard is set a little high. But, as we said in our first look in the June issue of this year, Yamaha could have added a clock to the cluster as well.
  • The way the instruments fit together and look is really nice, and everything seems to work well. The mirrors are on metal stick-outs, and while they look good, they’re not very useful. When we tried to look behind, the rider’s arms kept getting in the way, so we wished they were on slightly bigger points.

Suzuki’s Burgman 650 looks like a scooter

but is really a sports bike

That being said, the Suzuki Burgman is more than just a pretty face. It has a 650cc fuel-injected engine and an electronically controlled continuously variable gear. A small machine made for commuting in cities is the first thing that comes to mind when someone thinks of scooters.

1.The Burgman is a very different machine

To begin, its high-tech 638cc motor gives it plenty of power and comfort for long trips on the open road, setting it apart from regular scooters by many light years. For me, it wasn’t so much the machine as it was the SECVT.

  • Suzuki’s SECTV has more than one input, so it can find the right ratio for any scenario.
  • Suzuki’s SECTV has more than one input, so it can find the right ratio for any scenario.
  • It looks like the electric gearbox is what commuting machines and maybe even motorcycles in general will be like in the future.
  • You can shift up and down in Manual Mode, just like on a scooter with a regular gearbox, and there are five preset CVT ratios to choose from.

2.It can work in two different ways

Both Normal and Power. In Normal Mode, the Burgman’s engine revs are slowed down so that it uses less gas and moves more slowly through traffic. The Burgman “lopes,” while most bikes “buzz” or “scream” along.

The Burgman also feels like a luxury car because it is very well equipped. For example, there is a light in the storage area that turns on automatically when you lift the seat, lighting up the whole area in a way that reminds me of how thorough BMW is. The three storage spaces in the front shell came in very handy. On a motorcycle, a glove box is much more useful than in a car!

The Burgman also feels like a luxury car because it is very well equipped. For example, there is a light in the storage area that turns on automatically when you lift the seat, lighting up the whole area in a way that reminds me of how thorough BMW is. The three compartments in the front fairing came in very handy; a glove box on a motorbike is much more useful than one in a car.

When you switch to Power Mode, the engine starts up, giving you more horsepower for every degree they open the throttle. There is a button on the frame that changes between the two modes. Actually, it’s pretty funny that the devices that used to be on motorcycle handlebars (like the advance-retard lever, choke, and decompression lever for starting) have been replaced with something similar in current times. Still, smart people who were used to using game controls quickly learned how to use the buttons; it took older people a little longer to get used to them.

 

 

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